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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
worried about for the coming year? three familiar faces join us now. william dunkleberg, christy arsey and with us here in new york is john aarons-meyer founder and ceo of the small business majority. great to see you guys, all three of you. >> good to be here. >> good morning. >> we convinced john to come to new york this time. bill, christy, you guys are next. bill, i'm going to start with you. we is all saw small business optimism index has dropped. what do you see amongst the people that you talked to. >> we're seeing something different. we found small businesses are cautiously optimistic about the future. we now see unemployment at the lowest level it's been in four years. there are glimmers of hope. seven of ten of the small businesses that we polled, and it's a scientific poll across the country, not just of our membership. seven of out of ten say they're expecting the businesses -- they're plannin to hire and they expect the bitses e es busines grow in the next couple of years. they're very concerned about the middle class and the economy. it fuels their businesses and are lo
walked over to us and said, i love you have sleeves and collars. tell me the story. >> that's when i knew there was something about this business that's going to work. >> fancy new york was doing something different. nowhere in the collection would you find the common place long strapless dresses. theirs was vintage inspired, comfortable, primarily tea length dresses. >> the mood of our brand was to have a nostalgic approach to dressing on your wedding day. >> the business was a dream come true for the two brothers. steven handled the business while greg foredid the designing. fancy new york turned out to be a roller-coaster of highs and lows. including emotional thank yous from happy brides and a feature in martha stewart wedding. the lows, pretty much everything else. >> i always have water at my throat for bill payments, constantly worried about whose the next person to call me up and say something is overdue or my check bounced. >> though their designs have struck a cord, their sales have not been robust enough to sustain the business or pay themselves a salary. the brothers have give
and that means, steven, it is time for you to come back to the u.s. >> so that is the homework and we will meet again and i want to hear answers to all of these things, and we have one more surprise tonight, so in the meantime, go home, and take a little rest and look your best for when we meet again. >>> so did steven and gregory listen to us? will they change the company name? will steven move to new york? to find out those answers as well as what else we had in store for them, make sure you hang around for the second part of the makeover coming up. >>> like it or not, facebook's new time line format is almost here. m march 30th, the new platform will be rolled out across the popular social media site. the changes of the of all feel of the site are significant and how brands talk to customers and leverage content. what does this mean for your small business facebook page? jason keith is the founder of social media education company social fresh and he is here to give us a primer on the changes and how to customize the page in advance of the launch. >> thanks for having me. >> yes, the last th
investors who allowed us the transition of quitting our day jobs. >> the angels and a capital invest company invested because they saul income generating potential. >> my background is in advertising. i saw from the very beginning an opportunity to integrate brands into what we were building in a unique manner. >> he was inspired by one of the early records posted to the site. >> one of the first records that we saw come up on to our website was a record for the fastest time to open a bag of skittles and sort them by color. people in our community found interest in that category and were competing against one another. my advertising mind said, that's really interesting. that's a very powerful way to engage people. >> so, now, they call and pay record-setter to come up with fun ways to help get the words out about their products, brands like toyota prius. >> we came up with 200 toyota prius related world record challenges. >> the fastest time to sit in every sit of the prius and the fastest time to do a hand stand around the car. >> they did work with stride gum. >> their campaign is about lo
concerned about for the coming year? three familiar faces to "your business" join us now. william. christy is the president and ceo of the national association of self-enemployed and with us is jo john. great to see you. we convinced john to come to new york this time. okay, john. i'm going to start with you since you made the trip to new york. we saw small business optimism index from nfib, bill's group has dropped what have you seen? >> we're seeing somewhat different. we did a poll. we did it with christy's organization. we now see unemployment at the lowest level it's been in four years and we're in no means out of the woods but there is glimmers of hope that seven of ten of the small businesses that we polled and this is a scientific across the country, not just our membership. seven out of ten said they're planning to hire and they're expecting businesses to grow in the next couple of years. so they're cautiously optimistic. they're very concerned about fiscal cliff, however, very concerned about money being taken out of, the core of the middle class of our economy. it truly fuels th
business grow. for most of us, starting up a business is risky, relentless an, let's face it, stressful. get going past that start-up can sometimes seem like the end of the process but as the further of mother-in-law's kim chi discovered, that's when the growing pains can begin. from tacos to pizza to bagel, many ethnic foods have been easily adopted into america's mainstream diet but not all of them. >> i never imagined i would be in the business of selling korean food let alone something like kim chi. it is an extreme food. >> that's lauren, founder of mother-in-law's kim chi. her mother owns a popular korean restaurant in garden grove, california and she's been there since 1989. >> all this pressure. >> reporter: since she was a small child, lauren's mother has warned her, never share kim chi with non-koreans. >> they cannot adjust to eating. it's not good. >> while this cabbage dish is a staple in many korean families, its pungent aroma can be off putting for people who didn't grow up with it. i have mother-in-law's kim chi and a vegan recipe. >> that's why it's ironic several years
of using coupons or advertising in the paper or the radio, a lot of money you can't control. i recommend you take that money and convert it into gift certificates and send mailings to your neighborhoods with a letter inviting people to come to your store. that advertising money is coming right back to your store. it sounds risky. i promise you people will not only buy the value of the gift certificate, they are going to buy more z. how do i find out who to send them do? >> the united states post office has an awesome program, every door. you can choose by mailing route which neighborhoods you want to choose and you can limit that just like with any other kind of mailing option. you can limit it to 1,000 households or 5,000 households, whatever your budget will meet. >> what do you do so you can keep them beyond the holiday season? >> one of the things i recommend is to literally create, it's really more possible than you think, a membership community, to keep them coming back for more. so, for example, one program i really like, you know, if you know the book of the month club. you can l
to help your small business grow. for most of us starting up a business is risky and relentless and face it, stressful. getting past the start-up phase can seem like the end of the process and as the founder of mother-in-l mother-in-law's kishgs mchi discovered. from tacos to bagelles many ethnic foods have been adopted into mainstream diet. but not all of them. >> i never thought that i would be in the business of selling korean food let alone kim chi because it is an extreme food. >> that is lauren chung founder of mother-in-law's kimchi. her mother-in-law has owned a restaurant since 1989. >> all of this pressure. >> since she was a small child lauren's mother has warned her, never share kim chi with nonkoreans. >> and eating, we cannot fear, but not eating is not good. >> while this fermented cabbage dish is a staple in korean families, the pungent aroma can be off putting for those who did not grow up with it. and that is eye ais why it is ir lauren to sell kimchi. >> i will be at whole foods and there is a family of koreans, and that got me thinking, that is odd, why is she serving
to our next member of the team. dawn specializes in quickbooks. >> give us a sense of your accounting? >> not really. >> how do you track stuff? >> i don't. i have money coming in, i pay my bills and i see what's in my checking account and that eebs it. >> that blows my mind. how do you pay your taxes. >> i pay my sales tax but for 2011 i guessed. i guesstimated. >> you guessed. >> i kind of guesstimated and sent in an amount. >> i hope you guessed high because that could be trouble if it was low. >> i guess i guessed higher. >> that's a technical foul. >> shall we look at the books? >> uh-oh. >> literally, we want to see it. >> so this is the office? >> yes. this is where it all happens. >> i'm glad to see you have accounting records. >> those aren't mine. those are the previous business owner. these are mine. >> so it looks leak you followed their system. they headed back upstairs were dawn got erica started on a quick books account. go ahead and finish. now we've created the bank account. >> be brutally honest with me. erica's taking care of upstairs. what's your first impression?
december. i hear business owners say that, december's going to be a flop for us, you know, it's going to go all to the big retailers. >> i got it. so don't check out. >> don't check out. be in the game. this is your moment to grab market share from these people that are sleeping. >> once you get someone through the door, too, the people of the -- >> love them. love your customer. you're going pay the price, okay? and i wouldn't give discounts right now. your margins are already too narrow. i would offer some free service later in the year, january, february, something they wouldn't have bought anyway, package things. >> ivana agrees because she's shaking her head. thank you so much for giving me your advice. this is an exciting year. i grew up with a retail never the family so every holiday season i knew my dad was working very hard but i know it was an exciting time. thank you so much, you guys. >> for a small business, focusing on a niche is often the way to go. it gives you a chance to be the in humber one player. what do you do when your niche is too small. the owner of one backry figur
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)